Houston Seniors Have Resources for Building Social Circles

October 28, 2011

Sometimes, our worlds can become smaller as we age.  Our world may be limited to our homes, neighborhoods, families, or a close circle of friends.  Unfortunately, a rite of passage in aging is the loss of friends.  A circle of friends may move away to be near family, or they may pass on.

If your senior or other loved one is showing signs of loneliness or social isolation, it may be time to consider helping them reinvent their social circle.

Inviting new members into a social group is an easy way to enlarge a circle of friends.  Just as old friends have moved from your area; newcomers may be moving in and looking to establish new friends.

"The Social Gathering" a North Side ...

Helping your senior maintain a close circle of friends may help ward off loneliness and social isolation.

Varying social life routine opens doors to new opportunities and new faces.   Habits of the past may not fit your senior’s needs of today and an introduction to new ideas may help with a larger social network.  Volunteering at a hospital or neighborhood school for a few hours each week can open doors to new friendships.   Or, joining a hobby group, such as a gardening group or handcraft group, introduces new friends to the circle.  Additionally, the energy of renewing interest in an old hobby or developing a new hobby can add a new dimension to your senior’s world.

On a smaller scale, you may want to help your senior with intimate social gatherings such as hosting new and old friends for a cup of coffee or an afternoon tea break.  This is a wonderful way to renew old friendships while welcoming new neighbors or friends.

Losing friends can be difficult and joining a local grief or bereavement group may help acknowledge painful loses.  Groups can be found at local churches, synagogues or schools.    Houston resources include Dignity Bereavement Groups.

Investing a bit of extra time, ingenuity and patience can open doors to a whole new realm for you and your senior loved one.  However, realizing that a family caregiver’s time is limited and resources can be stretched, additional help from other family members or a paid caregiver may be necessary to help ease the day-to-day burdens.

Do you have a tip to share about renewing friendships or building new friendship?  Please share with our readers.

SourcedFrom Sourced from: Home Instead Content Library

Chris Lerch, Owner Home Instead Senior Care Houston

We hope this was helpful. If you have any questions or if you know of a senior that could benefit from our vast array of home care services in Houston, please call us at 832 379-4700 or email us. We accept most long term care insurance as payment and have a full time staff supervising more than 100 quality-trained home care personnel covering the Houston, Texas area.

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Chris M. Lerch, Owner

We hope this was helpful. If you have any questions or if you know of a senior that could benefit from our vast array of home care services in Houston, please call us at 832 379-4700 or email us. We accept most long term care insurance as payment and have a full time staff supervising more than 100 quality-trained home care personnel covering the Houston, Texas area.

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